thegoodlifeoncampus:

How amazing would these look? And super easy to make too!!

What you will need:
  • Cotton Batting { cleansing pleats to some }
  • Paper Lanterns
  • Flameless Candles { Ideally Super Cool LED ones }
  • Hot Glue Gun
{ The amounts you will need will depend on the number of…
otherkinresourceguide:

kakrikoran:

And the most brilliant minds discuss and share how these things are all connected and how its extremely shallow to categorize things in this manner.

Poor Eleanor Roosevelt must’ve been really shallow then.

otherkinresourceguide:

kakrikoran:

And the most brilliant minds discuss and share how these things are all connected and how its extremely shallow to categorize things in this manner.

Poor Eleanor Roosevelt must’ve been really shallow then.

wakingupinbakerstreet:

prettybluescarf:

tomhiddlestunned:

image

I SHOULDN’T BE LAUGHING SO HARD

This has literally made my life 89% better.

(via teamfreechill)

olesaysay:

This makes me cry ;(

'KIN SKYPE GROUP!!

cr0nagorgon:

man i want to make a skype group for Otherkin and Fictionkin who want to make more ‘kin friends but literally nobody was interested so im going to tag this one umm if you want to be added then add me on skype (pkmnheartgold), reblog this and when theres enough people I’ll make the group ^w^

Rules:

- Accept everyone no matter if their kintypes a spoon or a wolf or a star everyone will be welcomed

- Try to be active I guess?? It’d be no fun if nobody talked ;^;

yesss please join it’ll be fun!

if this doesnt get any notes I’ll be kinda embarassed n upset but I really hope there’s some people who wanna join! If there’s too many notes then I’ll make multiple groups so don’t be discouraged if you think too many people have joined!

(Source: bvsu, via ruinedchildhood)

ollietherottweiler:

africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)
Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.
The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.
In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.
Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.
I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

important

ollietherottweiler:

africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)

Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.

The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.

In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.

Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.

I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

important

(via sakura-tamiko)

spiderlassie:

fanfic-inator795:

WAIT
SO NOT ONLY IS WEIRD AL PLAYING THIS DOCTOR SCREWBALL GUY
BUT HE’S WANDER’S ‘NEMESIS’ FROM THE PAST?!
WHAT!

WAIT WANDER ACTUALLY HAS SOMEONE HE DISLIKES?!
or wait is Screwball his nemesis in the same way Hater is his nemesis

spiderlassie:

fanfic-inator795:

WAIT

SO NOT ONLY IS WEIRD AL PLAYING THIS DOCTOR SCREWBALL GUY

BUT HE’S WANDER’S ‘NEMESIS’ FROM THE PAST?!

WHAT!

WAIT WANDER ACTUALLY HAS SOMEONE HE DISLIKES?!

or wait is Screwball his nemesis in the same way Hater is his nemesis

(via whethervane)

tabbyborym:

either half of this fandom needs to wake up, or we need some new members, so let yourself go and drift off into the world of dudeghost

(i got most of these weird ass pictures from tumblr user lordvalsass)

a youtube playlist with every episode of dtmg can be found here

(via grimstrunk)